Destination Directory

Profiles

Our writers share an in-depth look at the "who's who" of group travel leaders, business owners and suppliers.

Having been a construction worker his whole life, Tom Haberland decided in 1989 that it was time to make a career move. He handed his résumé to a hotelier—and never looked back. The hotel manager gave Tom ninety days to prove himself; twenty-four years later, he continues to prove that decision right. Tom was, most recently, the Director of Tourism Sales for the Valley Forge Convention and Visitors Bureau, and he just finished celebrating his last year of serving the tour and travel industry. We had the chance to sit down and chat with Tom about his career, and about what advice he would leave the industry with as he retired at the end of 2013.

Batman has Robin. Quilt Man has Bobbin. Then again, maybe more accurately, Quilt Man has Paducah, Kentucky. Who is Quilt Man? We wanted to know about this colorful character who flies outside of the box and makes an impression upon Paducah visitors. We needed to know. That sparked a conversation with Fowler Black, Paducah Convention & Visitors Bureau sales director and the man behind the elegantly rendered mask.

For those of us who’ve been in the group travel industry awhile, when you think of Maryland you automatically think of Rich Gilbert. The small state operates on a tight budget, but its consistency in the marketplace, creative marketing efforts, cooperative programs, and partnerships have positioned Maryland to be successful in all it does.

Recent Blogs

What's on the Horizon? Generation Z Travel Trends

Millennials better make some room in that plane, train or automobile: Generation Z is beginning to enter the travel scene. Consisting of people born in the late 1990s to 2010s, they have grown up in a connected and instantaneous environment. They're adaptive and technologically savvy global citizens with aspirations to change the world.

And they want to see the world, too.

Natural Disasters and Tourism

The recent hurricanes in the United States and the Caribbean, the earthquake in Mexico, and floods occurring in parts of Europe ought to serve once again to remind us that much of the tourism industry is dependent on Mother Nature. Although we tend to focus tourism security more on human actions such as terrorism or crime, these acts of nature are as or often even more deadly than acts perpetrated by humans.

It’s Getting Hot in Here: Brand Activism in Diverse Political Climates

West Michigan was unseasonably warm last month.

I was beginning to think sweating was my new way of life.

The weather certainly seems to be symbolic of where we are as a country right now—chaotic, confused and heated.