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Meet the Way You Like

Everything you need, to meet the way you like. That's Four Points by Sheraton French Quarter, New Orleans.

Whether your meeting is big or small, Four Points by Sheraton French Quarter ensures a productive opportunity for your guests—and excellent service starts with the accommodations.

Seeking a boardroom setup, lecture hall, presentation room, outdoor courtyard or a reception area with a bar and lounge? The venue's 4,500 square feet of flexible meeting and banquet space can easily accommodate up to 180 people, and you're provided state of the art A/V equipment, professional planning and a catering team to assist you in creating a successful event.

Four Points by Sheraton French Quarter also offers complimentary wireless internet in guestrooms, public space and meeting space for up to 25 users, and a 24 Hour Business Center guarantees all deadlines are met on time.

Additionally, the venue's fitness center is stocked with cardio equipment and free weights. With room key access, you and your guests can work out when and how you like, 24/7.

Earn for work and redeem for fun with SPG® PRO. You can earn Starpoints® for travel you arrange for others and the meetings you plan professionally, right within your individual account. Business has never been so personal.

To confirm your meeting, please contact Four Points by Sheraton French Quarter at 504.524.7611. ext. 100.

Information and photo courtesy of Four Points by Sheraton French Quarter.


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