Destination Directory

Stitch This into Your Itinerary

Where can you find more than 500 artfully designed and carefully stitched quilts competing for more than $20,000 in prize money? In Pigeon Forge, Tennessee! The 23rd annual A Mountain Quiltfest will feature displays, classes, quilt appraisals and Western-themed entertainment from March 21 – 25, 2017, in the LeConte Center.

World-class instructors will teach more than 60 classes and lectures about America's popular folk art—including five classes taught by award-winning cowgirl poet Yvonne Hollenbeck and "the first lady of Western music" Jean Prescott. The duo will share the history of the Western prairie through song and poetry alongside historic photographs of quilters and generations-old quilts, including Hollenbeck's collection of family quilts that spans 140 years.

Displays will feature over 20 quilt categories, including one with this year's special theme—two fabrics.

If any member in your group has a quilt as a family heirloom, appraisals will be available from Candace St. Lawrence, an American Quilter's Society certified appraisal, by appointment on March 21, 23, 24 and 25. (You can make an appointment by contacting Lana Bowes: 865.429.7350 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..)

Interested in piecing together a quiltfest itinerary? Find more information on the event online at www.MyPigeonForge.com.

Written by Cassie Westrate, staff writer for Groups Today. 

Photo courtesy of the Pigeon Forge Department of Tourism.


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