Destination Directory

What Not to Wear: TSA Edition

When it comes to passing security, clothing can slow you down. Some accessories sound alarms; others merely look suspicious. To ensure smooth travels through Transportation Security Administration airport screening lanes, consider nixing these from your travel outfit.

Loose Dresses, Skirts and Shirts

This includes maxi dresses and skirts. They're dang comfortable and look pretty classy, but ... What are you hiding under there?

Bulky Pullovers

Jackets and bulky pullovers are one and the same to TSA agents. You'll either have to remove them, or be patted down.

Bobby Pins

A few bobby pins tucking your hair in place is OK, but too many could set off the metal detector. If you want to maintain your hair and skip the pat-down, fix your up-do after screening.

Cargo Pants or Shorts

TSA is serious about removing all items from your pockets—and if you've got a million of them, you're bound to forget something.

Metal Bracelets and Necklaces

Metal jewelry sets off the metal detector. As with bobby pins, consider putting jewelry on after screening.

Belts

Passengers often forget to take belts off before passing through the metal detector. Either remove it right away, or wear pants that don't require the accessory.

Shoes That Are Difficult to Remove

Removing shoes to pass airport security has been standard procedure for years. Footwear with a lot of laces takes forever to get off and put back on.

Offensive Clothing

Wearing clothing with offensive messages or pictures could even get you kicked off a plane.

Written by Cassie Westrate, staff writer for Groups Today.

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