Destination Directory

Core Values

Most companies, at some point or another, have created a mission statement that is meant to define their purpose or vision for conducting business. Mission statements can look great on a plaque hanging in your office or on your website for prospective clients to see, but when was the last time you reviewed it to make sure you and your staff are actually "living" it? Would you even be able to rattle it off without looking? If you haven't visited your mission statement in a while, or ever, there has never been a more critical time to do so.

 Behind every mission statement should be a set of core values that each employee adheres to. They are meant to be used internally, but aim to make your mission statement "real" and "true." A while back, we at Serendipity collectively created our core values to include Team, Initiative, Accountable, Respectful, and Service-Minded.

Core values are meant to drive everything, including who a manager hires, how to conduct performance reviews, how we choose to handle certain situations with clients, and how we perform and conduct ourselves on a daily basis. However, as time goes by, it's natural that if a company doesn't focus on them, they will be forgotten.

Over the last few months, team Serendipity has spent a great deal of time revisiting our core values. By doing this, especially at a time when there is so much uncertainty, we can re-commit to how we interact with each other and how we go about our work. We cannot control the economic challenges our country is facing. We can, however, control our interactions with each other and our customers. Choosing to adhere to the core values of your company makes your working environment stronger, stable and supportive.

Here's my challenge to you. If you haven't already, make the time to define your company core values. Once you have established what they are, make sure the entire team is a part of the process and make them a part of daily interaction. In our office, we all have a framed photo on our desk that includes our mission statement and core values. It's a constant reminder what we as employees should strive for. Each week during our company meeting, we discuss one value and make it the theme for the week. In addition, do your employee/performance evaluations touch on your core values? If not, consider making adjustments so you are evaluating your team on this priority.

When you entire team know the expectation of how they interact with other teammates and customers, it makes it much easier to provide guidance, direction and positive growth within your team. Good luck!

Written by: Kasie Smith, President and Publisher of Groups Today Magazine.
Photo courtesy of: Freedigitalphotos.net (rakratchada torsap)


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