Destination Directory

Business Practices

Knowing WHAT to measure can be as baffling as sifting through all the insights, analytics and numbers.

Knowing WHY you're measuring is key to your success.

Does your analysis give you a better idea of what action you can take? Do you understand your marketing direction or what resonates with your fans?

Let's dive into two popular Facebook tools to measure and analyze.

Do you know someone who is vocal about what he or she doesn’t like? Being mouthy and opinionated is a big turnoff, especially when you’re attempting to communicate with one of these “vocal” customers. If you have a customer who is mouthy when mad, think about how much more mouthy and opinionated he or she could be when happy!

When did you last spend quality time evaluating all aspects of your business? If you’re in sales, how much time, energy, and effort are you putting into to some client relationships and is your sales volume reflective of that time spent? More importantly, is it a profitable relationship for you and your company?

Most companies, at some point or another, have created a mission statement that is meant to define their purpose or vision for conducting business. Mission statements can look great on a plaque hanging in your office or on your website for prospective clients to see, but when was the last time you reviewed it to make sure you and your staff are actually "living" it? Would you even be able to rattle it off without looking? If you haven't visited your mission statement in a while, or ever, there has never been a more critical time to do so.

Recent Blogs

4 Ways to Dive Deep in Group Travel

Time to dive deep into group travel.

Literally.

13 Things That Can Go Wrong on Group Tours

Anything that can go wrong on a group tour hopefully won't, but probably will ... at least once during your career.

Wine Tasting Code Words

My wife is one of the most polite people you could ever meet. Whether this is due to her upbringing, an aspect of her demeanor, or just her go-to behavior, she is polite to a fault. This materializes itself in often unexpected places: She lets the neighborhood kids have first go at the biggest, ripest blackberries that grow on our fence; she feels compelled to listen to the full pitch when eating the food samples at our local price club; she turns shades of blush if anyone in our party offers criticism of a winery's offerings in front of the person pouring. After all, if you don't have something nice to say ...