Destination Directory

In Defense of Emojis

I may be a mid-20s milliennial, but I think I jumped on the emoji bandwagon a little later than most humans my age. I'm a writer, so my gut feelings toward anything destroying the written word aren't exactly warm and fuzzy. The Oxford English Dictionary named "emoji" 2015's word of the year, and that wasn't cool.

I've since converted, however.

Mostly because they're just so dang cute. But also because my No. 1 goal as a writer is to communicate a message—and I can no longer deny the value emojis play in getting messages across loud and clear.

Communication requires more than just words. When we're talking with someone over the phone, we have the luxury of hearing someone's tone of voice. In person, we can add facial expressions and body language to the mix. So, how do you make sure you're sending the right tone with your message when all you have is text?

Enter the emoji, an adorable little icon that adds sentiment to your statement. ("Emotion" is in the name, after all.)

Consider, for instance, the difference between:

Get lost!

and

Get lost! ⛵️

Emojis could help get your intended message across to your clients, loud and clear. When you're using emojis in marketing, consider the following tips:

1. Have a purpose. 

Emoji's could help catch your readers' attention in e-mail subject lines or social media posts. They could help you achieve the tone of your message and help your brand come across as more personable to your audience. 

2. Keep it casual.

OK. Emojis are officially accepted in the workplace. But that doesn't make them professional all the time. Don't use emojis when you're covering an important topic or situation—it could give your clients the impression that you aren't taking the subject matter seriously.

3. Still use words. 

The purpose of emojis isn't to replace words, but to add to words. People still read words.

4. Don't be an emoji junkie.

OK. I love emojis. You love emojis. He/she/it loves emojis.

But don't use them with every e-mail, text and social post. They'll lose effect.

Written by Cassie Westrate, staff writer for Groups Today.


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