Destination Directory

Niche Markets to Consider

It's no surprise to any group travel sales person that niche markets offer unique opportunities to grow your overall group sales. However, are you really tapping into all the markets that are available?

The key to focusing on niche markets is to provide a product/service/package that will be appealing to these specialty markets. With a lot of unique niches the success is depended on various partners.

The traditional niche markets focus on the SMERF market, (Social, Military, Educational, Religious, and Fraternal), but consider three other market segments to grow your niche business:

  • Celebration: Three out of four people went on one celebration get away last year. These trips celebrated anniversaries, milestone birthdays, reunions, and weddings.
  • Girlfriend Getaways: Fifty percent of women went on a girlfriend getaway last year, and 90 percent intend to do a girlfriend getaway in the next year. Create a package that a group of woman can and will enjoy doing together.
  • Brocations: Just like girlfriend getaways, men like to take their own brocation, too. Most people think of this as golfing trips, but lets face it, not all men like to golf, and many men would be drawn to cigar/liquor tasting getaways. Just remember, that like woman, all men are not alike so think outside the box to help create a great experience they can brag about.

Niche markets are key to growing overall group travel sales. I hope these three additional markets help you accomplish your goals in 2014.

 


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